Research

 

Below is a list of studies and research referenced in the Be You Again brochure and throughout our website.

Asleep DBS

A new study finds that the costs of asleep DBS and awake DBS are comparable with cost variation being greater among awake DBS procedures. The research also shows that DBS performed at a single US academic health center to compare favorably to costs across the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Clinical Database.

New research published in the Journal of Neurosurgery shows that initial results of asleep ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) DBS for essential tremor deem the procedure as safe and effective as the traditional awake DBS procedure for essential tremor. The study also shows lead placement errors to be slightly less in asleep DBS than awake DBS. Additional studies are underway to build upon these findings.

Study shows significantly improved outcomes for patients undergoing Asleep DBS with lead placement guided by computed tomography (CT).

Study looking at potential inaccuracy of traditional microelectrode recording (MER) as a tool for assessing lead placement during Awake DBS, providing support for Asleep DBS.

The accuracy of Asleep DBS is supported by  a study involving 309 patients that found leads placed with MER reach the intended target area only 64% of the time.

DBS

A new research paper written by Denver DBS Center founder, David VanSickle, MD, PhD, highlights the observable and unobservable errors present in traditional microelectrode recording (MER) compared to Mazor Renaissance Guidance System with CereTom CT image verification when conducting deep brain stimulation (DBS).

Parkinson’s Disease

Compared to medications, DBS significantly improves motor symptoms and quality of life for people with advanced Parkinson's disease. DBS is also found effective for at least 10 years.

DBS may extend life for Parkinson’s patients.

DBS in the earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease is effective, contrary to earlier recommendations that patients must have the disease for at least seven years to benefit.

DBS in patients under general anesthesia (asleep) using the traditional procedure found as safe and effective as the procedure performed under local anesthesia (awake).

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) plus medications can nearly double the number of “on” hours without dyskinesia each day.

DBS is more effective than medications in controlling tremors in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

DBS results in a nearly 50% average reduction in medication compared to medical therapy alone.

The initial cost of DBS is offset by savings in medications by patients with Parkinson’s disease in less than two years after the procedure.

Improvement in all motor symptoms—rigidity, tremor, facial expression, freezing—leads to improvements in quality of life, bodily discomfort and emotional well-being.

Essential Tremor

New research published in the Journal of Neurosurgery shows that initial results of asleep ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) DBS for essential tremor deem the procedure as safe and effective as the traditional awake DBS procedure for essential tremor. The study also shows lead placement errors to be slightly less in asleep DBS than awake DBS. Additional studies are underway to build upon these findings.

DBS has been shown to effectively suppress essential tremor for more than six years after implantation.

Dystonia

DBS reduces medication use for dystonia patients.